Republicans 414; Democrats 152

Posted on July 26, 2011

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Bravo to Senator Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire for displaying a chart on the Senate Floor today that clearly and factually shows each president for the past 50 years and their respective raises of the debt ceiling.

  • John F. Kennedy raised the debt ceiling 4 times for a total increase of 5%.
  • Lyndon Johnson raised the debt ceiling 7 times for a total increase of 18%.
  • Richard Nixon raised the debt ceiling 9 times for a total increase of 36%.
  • Gerald Ford raised the debt ceiling 5 times for a total increase of 41%.
  • Jimmy Carter raised the debt ceiling 9 times for total increase of 59%.
  • Ronald Reagan raised the debt ceiling 18 times for a total increase of 199%.
  • George H.W. Bush raised the debt ceiling 9 times for a total increase of 48%.
  • Bill Clinton raised the debt ceiling 4 times for a total increase of 44%.
  • Georg W. Bush raised the debt ceiling 7 times for a total increase of 90%.
  • Obama has raised the debt ceiling 3 times for a total increase of 26%.

All combined, Democrats presidents increased the debt ceiling a grand total is 152%.

All combined, Republican presidents increased the debt ceiling a grand total is 414%.

Perhaps you noticed that President Ronald Reagan, arguably the most popular Republican president on this list – and the faux-patron-saint of current Republican history-revisers,  raised the debt ceiling more than all of the Democrat presidents combined.

This must be what John Boehner is referring to when he says that “Republicans have always led the way in fiscal reform.”

Of course, by “reform,” he means “reckless spending.”

Do yourself a favor: Forget all the fecal-rhetoric and lies coming out of Washington.  You want to understand what’s going on with the country’s federal debt? Read this very clear, explanatory treasure trove of information from Ryan Witt at Examiner.com.  You’ll come away with a much clearer understanding of just how – and how often – you’re being lied to.

 

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